City of Binghamton, New York

Fire Prevention

Fire Prevention

The Fire Prevention Division provides the following services:

  • Public education.
  • Fire investigation to determine origin and cause.
  • Computerization of gathered information and fire department business.
  • Code compliance.
  • Elimination of unnecessary responses.

Smoke Alarms: Residential

 

Are they required?

YES - New York State Code requires smoke alarms be present and in working order in ALL residential properties. 

Who is responsible to supply, install and maintain the smoke alarms?

The property owner is responsible to supply, properly install and maintain all smoke alarms in a building. 

I rent my apartment or house.  Does that mean that my land lord is responsible to provide smoke alarms?

YES – However this does not relieve you from the responsibility of not tampering, altering, disabling or removing the units and notifying the land lord if they need service or replacement.  Remember - they are provided for YOUR SAFETY!

Does the smoke alarm have to be hard wired or can it be powered by a battery?

In new construction or substantially renovated residential properties, the smoke alarms will be hard wired into the homes power source and have a battery back- up.  These units will be interconnected, meaning that when one detects smoke, all units will alarm ensuring that occupants throughout the building are alerted.

In existing residential properties, battery powered smoke alarms can be installed.

AS OF JANUARY 1 2017, by LAW all smoke alarms sold and therefor installed in New York will only be powered by a 10 year sealed battery.  This is to ensure uninterrupted power and protection for 10 continuous years.  Additionally, the sensors within the alarm degrade at 10 years and should be replaced.  So, when the alarm begins to “chirp” that indicates both the batteries AND the sensors are at the end of their life.  Simply replace the entire unit.

The Binghamton Fire Department RECOMMENDS smoke alarms powered by the 10 year sealed battery due to the increased level of protection provided by the long term power source and the notification to replace the unit when the sensors have reached the end of their service life.

Where should smoke alarms be installed?

  •  In every bedroom.
  •  Outside of every bedroom or group of bedrooms if the doors are in a common hallway.
  •  At least one on every other floor that does not contain bedrooms.

 

Carbon Monoxide Alarms: Residential

Are they required?

YES – Amanda’s Law requires CO alarms be present and in working order in ALL residential properties that have a source of CO.

The 2010 Law requiring CO alarms in all new and existing residential buildings is named after Amanda Hansen, a West Seneca teen who lost her life to CO poisoning in January 2009 while sleeping over at a friend’s house.

What is Carbon Monoxide?

Carbon Monoxide or CO for short, is an odorless, colorless, tasteless gas that can kill by reducing the bloods ability to carry oxygen to vital organs.

Where does CO come from?

CO is a product of incomplete combustion. Any fuel-burning device has the potential to produce dangerous levels of CO gas. Examples of common devices that may emit CO include:

  • Fuel-fired furnaces (not electric)
  • Gas water heaters Fireplaces and wood stoves
  • Gas stoves
  • Non-electric space heaters
  • Gas dryers Charcoal grills
  • Lawnmowers, snow blowers, etc.
  • Automobiles
  • Gas powered generators

Who is responsible to supply, install and maintain the CO alarms?

The property owner is responsible to supply, properly install and maintain all CO alarms in a building. 

I rent my apartment or house.  Does that mean that my land lord is responsible to provide CO alarms?

YES – However this does not relieve you from the responsibility of not tampering, altering, disabling or removing the units and notifying the land lord if they need service or replacement.  Remember - they are provided for YOUR SAFETY!

Does the CO alarm have to be hard wired or can it be powered by a battery?

In new construction or substantially renovated residential properties, the CO alarms will be hard wired into the homes power source and have a battery back- up.  These units will be interconnected, meaning that when one detects smoke, all units will alarm ensuring that occupants throughout the building are alerted.

In existing residential properties, battery powered smoke alarms can be installed.

Battery powered CO alarms use a variety of battery types.  Currently available are units that are powered by a 10 year sealed battery.   This means you will not have to worry about changing the batteries for 10 years! Additionally, the sensors within the alarm degrade at 10 years and should be replaced.  So, when the alarm begins to “chirp” that indicates both the batteries AND the sensors are at the end of their life.  Simply replace the entire unit.

The Binghamton Fire Department RECOMMENDS CO alarms powered by the 10 year sealed battery due to the increased level of protection provided by the long term power source and the notification to replace the unit when the sensors have reached the end of their service life.

Where should CO alarms be installed?

  • In every bedroom containing a source of CO - duct work from a heat source in another room or floor is a potential source of CO!
     
  • In every bedroom that is on the same floor as a source of CO - even if there is no source of CO within the bedroom.
     
  • Outside of every bedroom within 15 feet.